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Home arrow Human Interest arrow Local arrow The Mangawhai Transaction (Pages 140-141)
The Mangawhai Transaction (Pages 140-141) PDF Print
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Human Interest - Local
Written by The Waitangi Tribunal   
Wednesday, 28 February 2007

Te Waiariki/Ngati Korora (Wai 620) are another coastal hapu, whose rohe extends from north of Ngunguru Harbour to Whangarei Heads, on the eastern coast, well north of Mangawhai. Their connection with Mangawhai is through ancestral kin connections with Ngai Tahuhui and Te Kawerau. Originally from Hokianga, Te Waiariki migrated south to Kaipara and moved up the Otamatea River and over the portage route to Mangawhai. They finally settled, long before 1840, in the Ngunguru area, where they had acquired rights by marriage and gifting from Ngai Tahuhu, and they remained in occupation there. Ngati Korora is a more recent kin grouping derived from Te Waiariki. These claimants admit shared interests with others in Mangawhai. Ngaire Brown of Te Waiariki told the Tribunal that 'the extent of such interests included use of the Mangawhai as a portage and stop over on fishing expeditions'.

The customary use of Mangawhai by Te Waiariki was explained by claimant representative. Mitai Paraone-Kawiti:

Te Waiariki’s fishing grounds extended along the eastern coast, and to and beyond the Mangawhai. In my own lifetime, I can remember Te Waiariki men making double oared fishing scows from timber sourced from Ngunguru. They were designed to travel great distances.

Of particular significance was fishing for mango pare [hammerhead shark] outside of the Mangawhai area.

Te Waiariki customarily used the Mangawhai area as a portage for access to the Kaipara. Te Waiariki would camp temporarily from time to time at the Mangawhai during fishing expeditions and expeditions to the Kaipara.

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Last Updated ( Saturday, 21 April 2007 )
 
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